AMELIA D'ONOFRIO






This is an exploration of the spaces my family and I share. My maternal family has always felt distant to me, physically because they live in Ohio but also emotionally, I never formed a solid connection to them. I began to uncover the concealed using photography to study the space and people around me, focusing on how to create a stronger relationship with my family and preserve that connection. A large part of that was quilting, a skill that was passed down through my great grandmother, to my grandmother, to my mom and then to me. The preservation of this skill and thus, the preservation of the family through generations. Making these quilts allowed space for me and my grandmother to communicate through a shared admiration that we never had before. The quilts on display here were made by myself along with my mother, Nancy, my mother’s sister, Auntie Diana, and my grandmother, Grandma Murri. The individual quilt squares we put together were made in the 1950s by my great grandmother, Grandma Ursul, making this an intergenerational quilt.

However, skills or ideas like this are only secure if the person receiving them is prepared to pass them down as well. I have no intention of having children and in this sense, this artistry will die with me within the context of my family line. To counteract this loss, I planned miniature workshops during the week of my show to teach sewing/embroidery to whoever was interested in learning. This was a way for me to continue the preservation of this skill and allow a piece of my show to hold a place outside of the gallery.



Contact Information
Instagram: @armd.illo
Web: armdillo.com